Even Digital Advertising Platforms Are Turning Against Russia. Who (Or What) Will Be Next?

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If the world was looking for another topic of conversation than Coronavirus, Vladimir Putin certainly has been willing to oblige. Clouded in a haze of state-provided propaganda is the truth: Russia's unprovoked attack on Ukraine was founded in nothing more than Putin's greed and an unquenchable thirst for power.

Another undeniable truth: a minimal list of supporters aside, the majority of the world is horrified, angry, and standing in full support of Ukraine. These emotions run deep, too. Seemingly everyone is taking direct and very public action against Russia's invasion – this is even despite Putin's very real and believable threat of deploying nuclear attacks against anyone who retaliates. In addition to economic and political sanctions from the United States and countries around the globe, huge companies are responding as well. Not only have Visa and Mastercard suspended their operations entirely in Russia, McDonald's is closing its doors to the Kremlin, and Stoli Vodka is going through a complete rebranding as a result. (We support the liquor company's move here - but let's be honest, did anyone ever say the whole name anyways?)

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These guys aren't alone, either – and others will soon follow as the conflict continues to escalate. Major digital platforms are amongst the most recent to take a stand. Search engine powerhouses Google and Bing have suspended all advertising sales in Russia and smaller players such as DuckDuckGo, Yahoo, and AOL. Even though they aren't a search engine, Apple has also stopped running search ads from Russia on the App Store.

Social media sites have taken a similar stance as Microsoft and Google. Russians are now unable to access LinkedIn entirely, while Twitter and Facebook have also taken measures to halt advertising as well.

While all of the sanctions mentioned above certainly will send a direct and noticeable message to Russia and its citizens, the restrictions from digital entities are unique in both purpose and impact. In addition to serving as a form of punishment, this response acts as a worldwide offensive that limits internet "noise" and information from being published and shared.

There is no doubt that other similar consequences will be enacted to cripple Putin and his war efforts, stemming from multiple sources and various industries. The biggest question is who (or what) will come next? And when it does, what will be enough to get Putin to care about it genuinely? Only time will tell. Regardless of what moves are made, it is inevitable that the world will pay attention to it.

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If the world was looking for another topic of conversation than Coronavirus, Vladimir Putin certainly has been willing to oblige. Clouded in a haze of state-provided propaganda is the truth: Russia's unprovoked attack on Ukraine was founded in nothing more than Putin's greed and an unquenchable thirst for power.

Another undeniable truth: a minimal list of supporters aside, the majority of the world is horrified, angry, and standing in full support of Ukraine. These emotions run deep, too. Seemingly everyone is taking direct and very public action against Russia's invasion – this is even despite Putin's very real and believable threat of deploying nuclear attacks against anyone who retaliates. In addition to economic and political sanctions from the United States and countries around the globe, huge companies are responding as well. Not only have Visa and Mastercard suspended their operations entirely in Russia, McDonald's is closing its doors to the Kremlin, and Stoli Vodka is going through a complete rebranding as a result. (We support the liquor company's move here - but let's be honest, did anyone ever say the whole name anyways?)

Image
These guys aren't alone, either – and others will soon follow as the conflict continues to escalate. Major digital platforms are amongst the most recent to take a stand. Search engine powerhouses Google and Bing have suspended all advertising sales in Russia and smaller players such as DuckDuckGo, Yahoo, and AOL. Even though they aren't a search engine, Apple has also stopped running search ads from Russia on the App Store.

Social media sites have taken a similar stance as Microsoft and Google. Russians are now unable to access LinkedIn entirely, while Twitter and Facebook have also taken measures to halt advertising as well.

While all of the sanctions mentioned above certainly will send a direct and noticeable message to Russia and its citizens, the restrictions from digital entities are unique in both purpose and impact. In addition to serving as a form of punishment, this response acts as a worldwide offensive that limits internet "noise" and information from being published and shared.

There is no doubt that other similar consequences will be enacted to cripple Putin and his war efforts, stemming from multiple sources and various industries. The biggest question is who (or what) will come next? And when it does, what will be enough to get Putin to care about it genuinely? Only time will tell. Regardless of what moves are made, it is inevitable that the world will pay attention to it.